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Howdy.  I have many hobbies and post what I can, when I can, here and on social media.  Below are some quick links if you want to quickly tune into a certain hobby.

** Throughout the site you can click on images to enlarge them. **

STORM CHASING: Click Here    Lightning

ROCKHOUNDING: Click Here

MUSIC PRODUCTION / DJ: Click Here or these external sites:

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Multicast’s Multicaster OBQ-16 debut in Japan!

Well, it is official, our new album is released!  July 18th, 2016!  The initial release is limited to Japan as an insert to the Iron Feather Journal magazine for the opening of the Sapporo Zine Festival in Hokkaido.  We will be receiving a limited amount of magazines and will have a USA/World release in early September, the exact date is still to be determined.

As you wait for the next 6 weeks, you can preview the entire album here…

IFJ stenciled artwork

Front covers, both multi-color stenciled artwork!

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IFJ Multicaster back covers

IFJ / Multicaster back covers!

As the typical Multicast / Obliq Recordings way, we created each of the covers by hand.  They are hand stenciled with recycled spray paint in multicolor!  The Iron Feather Journal inserts are limited edition to 200, all hand-numbered.  100 will be released in Japan, 100 outside of Japan.

Multicaster sleeves

Multicaster album sleeves drying on the manufacturing line, by the river!

Here is what a spindle of 170 looks like!

Multicaster CDs

Stack of Multicaster CDs.

Luckily my partner in crime, Cryptographics, is well versed at silk-screening and has the mass production process down!  He first created a registration piece that was offset for the thickness of the cover.  Then he created multiple stencils out of plastic to handle the ink.  This project requires many stencils, one for each image on the cover that will have its own separate color.  Thus, multiple iterations of paint and wait are required for the final cover to be complete!

Stencil Registered

Stencil registered with the first cover ready to go, as you can see all we do is move the left registration to the right side and we’re ready for the next image and colors.

The final product revealed

Tasty ultra limited black cover gettings its second image sprayed

Stay tuned to our Facebook and Instagram pages, or stay tuned to this site or Obliq Recordings for release date information. Don’t sit on getting the limited IFJ magazine or it will be gone!

July storms

Been out chasing and spotting storms a couple of times in June.  I also got a call from the NWS about a storm passing through Larkspur, but of course we were away from home in Englewood and I could only spot from afar…

This first storm system was June 13th.  I was all over this day, playing the southern part of the Palmer Divide and then heading to Northeast Colorado calling it off around Yuma.

Yoder wind farm and wall cloud

This storm had a huge wall cloud that was dragging the ground, but I couldn’t see any rotation. There was plenty of rotation with these windmills, though, near Yoder.

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The storm changed quite a bit near Calhan, a nice little scud cloud swirled up and then disappeared into the storm.

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The two cells collided and became tornado warned near Fort Morgan.

Brush Inflow

As the two cell collided in Morgan County, this was the initial inflow component to the storm. It had been tornado warned for about 30 minutes at this time.

Brush Colorado Tornado Warned Storm

The storm I followed off the Palmer Divide collided with another storm in Morgan County. Thus there were two inflow sections to this storm for a while, this was the second, over Brush while the storm was tornado warned.

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Severe warned storm near Akron.

Akron Inflow

Right under the inflow scud, I love this part of the storm as the clouds are low and quickly moving as they form and then get sucked up into the storm

Cloud painting near Yuma.

Great cloud textures with this storm near Yuma.

Upward Streamer Lightning

Caught some lightning near Last Chance; this one was cool as there was a tower and some upward streamers and cloud to cloud lightning. I can’t believe they didn’t connect; they did the next time!

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On June 19th a set of storms formed on the Palmer Divide.  There were two storms where I lived.  The first was a bit north and was great viewing from the back porch.  Most bolts were in the cloud, every now and then a spike would be seen and I was able to capture several of them.  The last storm that formed west of me was putting down very little lightning and didn’t show much on radar.  The lightning was good cloud-to-cloud anvil crawlers though.  I timed them, they were between 4.5 and 5 minutes apart, on average.  I was able to capture one, and it was the last one of the storm which dissipated overhead!

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A spike coming directly towards the camera.

Larkspur lightining

One of the few remaining bolts from this short-lived cell.

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Larkspur anvil crawler.

The last lightning from this storm as it sparked overhead!

As this storm died, I jumped in the car and headed back out to check out the previous storm from one of my favorite lookouts in eastern Douglas County, about 15 minutes away. The storm became severe warned for half-dollar sized hail, but in spotting it I only saw nickel sized hail.  Watched the storm until after midnight as it entered Elbert County and then headed home.

Fireflies and lightning

East Douglas County, you can’t see them, but the field was filled with fireflies!

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Eastern Larkspur Barn

A cool barn I pass just east of Larkspur. It is pretty this time of year!

Another storm came to me on June 28th.  This one had some neat lowerings that were right overhead.

Larkspur storm

Looking straight up in the front yard.

Larkspur Storm

Same formation but from the back porch.

larkspur storm clouds

Loved the colors and motion of this storm!

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This storm put down some lightning and light rain at Devils Head, but didn’t end up doing much other than looking spectacular as it flowed across the Palmer Divide.  Taken from Jackson Creek road, overlooking Castle Rock.

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Fourth of July Pictures

It has been a busy summer so far, lots of family activities and work projects have called for long hours.  On the fourth of July we headed to my folks house near Red Feather Lakes Colorado for some needed R&R; and for my daughter and mom to finish a 4-H project, her very ambitious quilt!  I took the camera and was able to catch timelapse video and some interesting pictures.  The video is forthcoming, but here are some of my favorite stills.  As always, images can be clicked for a larger perspective!

Their house had three outside lights and each day there were a variety of moths hanging out on the side of the house.  I’ve never seen thing large of a variety in one spot before.

Signoid Prominent Moth (Clostera albosigma)

Signoid Prominent Moth (Clostera albosigma)

Big Poplar Sphinx Moth (Pachysphinx modesta)

Big Poplar Sphinx Moth (Pachysphinx modesta)

Big Poplar Sphinx Moth (Pachysphinx modesta)

Big Poplar Sphinx Moth (Pachysphinx modesta)

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St. Lawrence Tiger Moth (Platarctia parthenos)

St. Lawrence Tiger Moth (Platarctia parthenos)

Fly on Columbine

Fly on Columbine. Colorado’s state flower and state pest! :)

Morning Glory Plume moth (Emmelina monodactyla)

Morning Glory Plume moth (Emmelina monodactyla)

Morning Glory Plume moth (Emmelina monodactyla)

Morning Glory Plume moth (Emmelina monodactyla)

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St. Lawrence Tiger Moth (Platarctia parthenos)

St. Lawrence Tiger Moth (Platarctia parthenos)

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Boogie and the Big Poplar Sphinx Moth

Boogie and the Big Poplar Sphinx Moth

St. Lawrence Tiger Moth (Platarctia parthenos)

St. Lawrence Tiger Moth (Platarctia parthenos)

One-eyed Sphinx Moth (Smerinthus cerisyi)

One-eyed Sphinx Moth (Smerinthus cerisyi)

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Green Fly

Green Fly

Small-eyed Sphinx Moth (Paonias myops)

Small-eyed Sphinx Moth (Paonias myops)

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 Angulose Prominent Moth

Angulose Prominent Moth

White Furcula Moth (Furcula borealis)

White Furcula Moth (Furcula borealis)

One-eyed Sphinx Moth (Smerinthus cerisyi)

One-eyed Sphinx Moth (Smerinthus cerisyi)

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Didn’t rain too much, but this storm put off a great rainbow!

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Tooks some photos of the quilting process.  Many will go on Daphne’s presentation and in her record book.

Daphne's first quilt on Grandma's quilting machine

Daphne’s first quilt on Grandma’s quilting machine

Mom's Pin cushion

Mom’s Pin cushion

Mom's fabric all sorted

Mom’s fabric all sorted

My son, my dad, and I took a drive up to Deadman Fire Watch Tower / lookout.

Deadman fire watch tower

Deadman fire watch tower

Rawah Wilderness

Rawah Wilderness from Dead Man fire watch tower

Crystal Lakes and Northern Colorado Front Range

Crystal Lakes and Northern Colorado Front Range from Deadman fire watch tower

Deadman fire watch tower

Deadman fire watch tower

Old Deadman wooden tower base

Old Deadman wooden tower base

Lush green floor in the forest

Lush green floor in the forest

Interesting forest panorama

Interesting forest panorama

Larimer County meadow looking at the Rawah Wilderness

Larimer County meadow looking at the Rawah Wilderness

Deadman Creek valley

Deadman Creek valley

Reflect & Refract

Reflect & Refract

North Fork Cache de Poudre River

North Fork Cache de Poudre RiverJul

Locating Devils Head claims

I led a field trip with the Lake George Gem and Mineral Club to Devils Head today. Given that there were a lot of cars we parked in a popular area, one which has several claims surrounding it.  Part of the responsibility of rockhounding is to know where claims are located and not to mineral trespass, so I put together a google terrain map with these claims on it so we were sure to understand where the claims were so we dug elsewhere.  Many folks asked me how I did this, so I decided to detail the process here.

First off, it is important for anyone Rockhounding to understand the rules.  Here are useful information links for Mining Claims and Rockhounding in the state of Colorado.

As you read above, part of staking a mining claim is to produce a Certificate Of Location (COL) and file with both the County Recorder’s office and the BLM.  Part of this document is to record exactly where the claim is located, most of the time this includes a map that you can see the exact corner posts and perimeter.  These documents are public record, and you can research and request copies of them for a small fee (or free as I will demonstrate) from either the BLM or the County of record.  The BLM manages all mining claims on public land, so you will want to use their research tools to determine the status of any claim.  Note that the LR2000 online website may not contain the latest and greatest information; so getting your information direct from the BLM is the best source.

I like to create a prospecting map so I know the vicinity of where these claims corner posts are (or should be, sometimes the claim owner does not have them marked).  To do this is a 3-step process.  Luckily Douglas County has their records available to search online, so you can get this information from the privacy of your own home–but most counties are not that advanced with their software yet.

  1. Research which claims are active, this requires knowing the Meridian, Township, Range and Section where you are looking.  Review this blog posting for more information on using the LR2000 online web application.  For the popular Devils Head area “Virgin Bath”, this is
    1. Meridian:  6th Principal
    2. Township:  9S
    3. Range:  69W
    4. Section 21
  2. Once you have the claim owners information from LR2000, you can locate the COLs from the Douglas County Recorder’s website
  3. On this website, click on Documents and read and accept their rules. You will need to have a valid account, which is free, to view documents online; so you should go through the registration process.
  4. Choose Location Certificates as the document type and put in a reasonable date range.DouglasCountyRecords_LocationCerts
  5. From the search results, you can review or even download the COLs from this site.  To review, just click on the row, or add to the review list with the +.

LocationCerts_Example

6.  Within each document there is a map, you may need to refer to a topo map to know the Township/Range/Section, but from here you can see the claim boundaries.

7.  Print these out, or combine into a single “rough” prospecting map using Google Maps.

8.  When out prospecting you can use these maps to get the vicinity of the corner posts so you can find them and ensure you are digging on non-claimed areas.

Hope this was helpful.  Happy prospecting!

 

Prospecting Tips and Hints

Last year I published an article How to Find Crystals that detailed some of the techniques I use and general prospecting tips, hoping to give several tips and hints to aid in expediting the learning curve of digging crystals.  I’ve gotten some great feedback from that article and appreciate all the comments.

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One of the things I tried to cover in that blog posting was what to look for on the surface and how to know if you are in a good spot and should continue digging, or bury the hole and continue the prospecting elsewhere.  I knew it would be difficult to share that experience, as I’m still learning myself and it’s one of those things you can read about all day long but you don’t “get it” until you actually can see and experience how it is done.  The pictures and text in that article were helpful I feel; but it still left me with questions after reading it–knowing that I had a plan for this year’s prospecting trips…

That blog posting was just the first of many postings I plan to do sharing what I’ve figured out on finding pegmatite crystals.  I was able to get out digging late this spring and my goal was to take some video while I was on the hunt, hopefully showing what I look for on the surface and what I look for as I follow the pegmatite trail to the crystals (assuming I find crystals, which many times I don’t)!  This video hopefully will provide some tips and hints of what works for me in the toughest part of the process, the initial prospecting and test holes.

Unfortunately due to leaving the camera in the sun too long, the pocket extraction video was corrupt, but the good stuff from a prospecting perspective was saved showing progress as I was hunting for the pocket.  You’ll see that demonstrated in the video below.

I would love your feedback, questions and suggestions.  I plan to do other videos showing different techniques.

The small crystal pocket I eventually hit I’m calling the OneTwo.  It was mainly Microcline crystals, most were Carlsbad twinned!  On these, once cleaned up, opposite faces had a blue tint of Amazonite to them; not as deep of green color as you find elsewhere in the region, but still really nice and a lot of fun.  The smokey quartz I found all had secondary coatings of a darker colored quartz which will be very difficult to remove.

Amazonite

Interesting cluster of Amazonite / Microcline joined at a ~45 degree angle.

Amazonite Carsbad Twin

Carlsbad twinned Amazonite (light blue) with a small amount of cleavelandite sprays.

Carlsbad Amazonite

Nice little pair of Carlsbad twinned Amazonite with a bit of cleavelandite.

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These are the largest crystals from the pocket, each about 3.5 inches tall. They had to be repaired as they came out in 3 pieces, the cap to the larger crystal was cleaved off and the two crystals had been separated and were found about a foot from each other in the pocket.

smokey quartz

Smoky Quartz showing the secondary quartz growth. These have been soaked in a heated chemical bath for several weeks and look at lot better than they originally did; but this is as far as I will clean them as the quartz underneath is not worth the effort.

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Some of the nicer twinned amazonites from the OneTwo pocket.

Smoky Quartz

Examples of the coated smoky quartz from the OneTwo. The larger crystals are nearly 3 inches long.  There were mostly microcline crystals in the pocket; which is opposite of what I typically find in the region.

Late May Storm

There have been several great stormy days here in Colorado in early May; but my schedule has prevented me from chasing on those good days.  I’ve been itching to get out; and luckily we had a good day before we left for our family vacation!

Got several lucky shots of lightning

My son and I got an opportunity to head out on May 26th.  We targeted Limon and decided we’d then go where the storms popped up as the forecast was difficult.  The storms fired along the Colorado front range early in the day; and put down some hail, but those storms were moving due north and had already formed a line; so we punched through and continued to our target.  Once in Limon, we saw some development to the south and headed that way to check them out.

The weather was strange, it was pretty chilly (about 52 degrees) and nothing was going up discreet.  We stopped at the first storm and noted a wall cloud feature on a storm, so we watched it.  It did have a little rotation; but just as it was looking good the inflow got cut off and the storm turned into a massive rainy mess.  So we left it and headed Southeast towards the front end of the cells.

Early wall cloud, temp was about 50 degrees.

Early wall cloud, temp was about 51 degrees.

A small amount of rotation.

A small amount of rotation as this wall cloud continued

We were able to see a small, short lived funnel near Wild Horse and as we were heading south towards some great looking structure near Kit Carson the storm overtook us.  There was a tornado spotted from this cell but traffic was pretty hairy and we ended up abandoning that storm and heading north.  We saw some great lightning, Hunter actually saw a positive bolt from the top of a tower which is great; I’ve never seen one of those.  By the time we got north of I-70, the front edge of the storms were all out by the Kansas border, and we decided to not pursue those into Kansas and instead just watch the remaining daytime lightning south of Yuma and then head home.

A funnel was forming; I rushed back to the car to ensure Hunter could see it; but by then it had dissipated. It went about 1/2 way to the ground, but was just a small finger.

Here a funnel was forming, but I didn’t get a shot of it as it was 1/2 way to the ground as I was rushing back to the car to ensure Hunter saw it!  It lasted for just a minute or two; but the coulds were all active in this area.

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Interesting structure as the storm overtook us

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Aroya historic school house!

The Aroya historic school house was in use until the early 1960s.

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The greens are beautiful this time of year!

South of Yuma we caught up to the last lightning of the evening.  We parked next to a grain bin and under these power lines; ended up getting some great day lightning photos; I was holding the camera by hand and was surprised this technique actually worked as it wasn’t dark yet!

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Castle View JV Track

When asked for volunteers for this year’s Castle View JV Track season; I wanted to try out my new camera and learn how to take sports pictures so I did it; I was going to be at all the meets already.  I have never taken track pictures before and was excited for the challenge.  In summary, I found that taking pictures up close and personal is the style I like.

For archival purposes, here are the pictures that made it to the coach’s blog.  Going back and looking at them I feel I did get better technique and quality as the year progressed, so I’m happy with the experience and look forward to doing more in the future!

New Multicast Album forthcoming – Iron Feather Journal Collaboration

I received an email from an old friend who nows lives in Northern Japan asking if my band Multicast would be interested in another collaboration project with the Iron Feather Journal cyberpunk zine.  Rewind back to 1999, the year the late Prince sings about, where we did our first collaborative project with the Zine.  We produced a 10″ 4-track EP vinyl, silk-screened cover and included the Iron Feather Journal #17 magazine.  Not only was this a fun project, but it was successful selling a 1000 copies worldwide.

The magazine has a really old-school feel as the pages are laid out by hand and then photocopied.  None of this modern computer layout stuff for this zine!  Content varies, but is cyber-culture and music related.

Multicast Iron Feather Journal 17

Multicast’s Iron Feather Journal #17, limited colored vinyl

Iron Feather Journal 17

The entire Iron Feather Journal #17 package, with record, magazine and 2-color silkscreened cover.

The Iron Feather Journal has moved to northern Japan and is planning the next zine to premiere at the Sapporo Zine Festival in mid-July.  This time we’ll do a CD, a 10-track full length Multicast project.  The number of magazines will be limited with some available here in the USA from Obliq Recordings after the festival.  We plan to do 4-color stenciled cover art, each one will be hand created so they will likely all be unique.

Track selection and sequencing was completed in late April 2016.  Mastering is scheduled for May 10th and we’ll send to press shortly after.  Then they will be shipped to Japan and incorporated with the magazine which will be created there.

eta-Aquarids

This year’s eta-Aquarids meteorite shower was one I’ve been waiting for as it was close to a new moon; with the moon rise just before dawn.  This should be ideal conditions for watching a meteorite shower.

eta-Aquarids are produced from the debris left from Haley’s Comet.  These are very fast shooters and have been said to be large and leave long trails; sometimes lasting for minutes.  I’ve only seen a couple of meteorites that have left trails for longer than a couple seconds, so I’ve been looking forward to this particular shower.

eta-Aquarids Crescent Moon

Crescent moon on the eve of the eta-Aquarids rising above Larkspur Butte

The peak is Cinco de Mayo, so I went out and viewed them the morning of and the night after this date.  The shower has a large window of time so hitting the peak on this day is sometimes off.  It was somewhat hazy the morning of but I was able to see a few small shooters.  Obviously it wasn’t the peak; or if so I was unlucky.  I did do a timelapse and caught one on film.

eta-Aquarids meteorite

eta-Aquarids meteorite with some color from light pollution and haze

I’m trying out a new lens, a Rokinon 14mm fixed f/2.8 lens which is often praised for astrophotography work. It is manual focus but so far I’m not having a focus problem like I have had with other lens. I took these at ISO 1600 for 15 seconds and am so far excited about the results. So far (it’s in the middle of the second night), there is a thin cloud cover at about 30k; you can sometime see through (barely) the clouds but the sky is mostly covered; making viewing difficult. I have seen several shooters but they have been relatively small and faint with the clouds; probably faint without the cloud cover too.

Aquarids Milky Way over Larkspur

Milky Way over Larkspur with Aquarids Satellite

On the morning of May 6th, there was substantial cloud cover.  I went out about 11:30 and I could see the clouds coming from the South.  They overtook the stars about 12:30; I looked again about 3:30 and it was still cloudy; but at 7:30 it was clear.  These pictures illustrate that even living in a rural area the light from neighboring towns 15 minutes away is quite substantial.  The could cover was relatively light, however, and for a while you could see the stars through the clouds; through open exposure on the camera anyway.

Light pollution

Light pollution from Castle Rock reflecting off the clouds really stands out when there is cloud cover

Light Pollution - Aquarids

Light pollution reflecting off the clouds from Monument

April 26 2016 Thunderstorm

Limon wind farm

Thunderstorm over the Limon Colorado wind farm.

With a strong low pressure system active over the region, there were forecast isolated thunderstorms in NE Colorado; with a Moderate Risk posted through Central Kansas and Oklahoma.  If there were any storms coming off of the Palmer Divide I decide I would chase them; but the system didn’t appear active enough in Colorado to chase too far from home.

Leaving work in East Aurora I noted there was a storm forming on the Palmer Divide, around Kiowa.  Looking at the velocity couplet of the Doppler radar I decided this storm was worth checking out.  I decided to take the long way home from work and head east.

A call home provided me with the information that along the Rampart Range it was snowing, and the temperature leaving work was 47 degrees; not optimal for thunderstorms; but the storm forming outside of Kiowa had rotation and many lightning strikes.  Odd things happen in the spring in Colorado!

I decided to get in front of the storm in the hopes of getting a time-lapse of it coming at me; there were low level clouds to the west of the storm so that seemed like the only view available.  So I went to Last Chance and then south into the Limon wind farm.  I was able to get in good position and directly in front of the storm.  It was 50 degrees and mostly cloudy in front of the storm, but the storm was still producing a good amount of lightning as it approached; and obviously hail as seen with the white curtains.  As the storm went overhead, it started to hail about marble size and covered the ground with about an inch deep.  As the storm passed over, with the change of temperature, the hail and rain turned to snow.  This was the first time I have been able to see lightning while it was snowing; I’ve heard snow thunder before, but not seen lightning.  The air temperature after the storm was 36 degrees.

On the drive home there was some great cloud structure and some fog from the weather that produced all the snow along the mountains; which provided some surreal views.  As I got home there was 3 inches of snow that had fallen.  Again, crazy early spring storms on the high plains!

Snow virga

Virga clouds SE of Kiowa, likely snow

Castle Rock sunset

West side of Castle Rock at sunset, almost looks like sunset at the beach!

Pikes Peak

Raspberry Butte in the foregrounds Pikes Peak peeking out of the clouds