Quick Guide to this site…

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Howdy.  I have many hobbies and post what I can, when I can, here and on sometimes on YouTube.  Below are some quick links if you want to quickly tune into a certain hobby:

STORM CHASING: Click Here

ROCKHOUNDING: Click Here

MUSIC PRODUCTION / DJ: Click Here  or these external sites:

Rockhound’s Guide to Identifying Federal Mining Claims

Federal Mining Claims are granted to US Citizens for the purpose of extracting the minerals for commercial gain.  Rockhounding does not require a mining claim, however Rockhounds cannot mineral trespass on active mining claims.

The BLM’s Guide to Rockhounding is helpful for defining the general rules and responsibilities for Rockhounding.  The BLM’s Guide to Mining Claims defines the claim owner’s responsibility to clearly mark their claim so that Rockhounds have the ability to know where they can dig.  As part of maintaining a claim, the claim owner has to agree to erect corner posts/markings on the claim site:

The undersigned testifies all monuments required by law were erected upon the subject claim(s), and all notices required by law were posted on the subject claim(s) or copies thereof were in place, and at said date, each corner monument bore or contained markings sufficient to appropriately designate the corner of the claim to which it pertains and the name of the claim(s).

Note that a mining claim only grants mineral rights to the claim owner, it still is public land and unless there are dangers (which will be clearly marked) citizens still can use our land.

In my prospecting I have seen several types of markings for Federal Mining Claims.  As a rockhound I appreciate when the claim owner posts documentation on each of the corner posts with GPS coordinates so I can quickly identify the claim boundaries in my GPS unit.  I appreciate when on the road into the claim or near pits/digs there is an obvious posting on a tree stating that the area is claimed.  I’ve seen center/side posts erected which is helpful too!  The easier the claim owner makes it to let the Rockhound know where the claim is the easier it is to not have accidents.

Corner post including paperwork on this federal mining claim

Corner post including paperwork on this federal mining claim

That said, I know that many times claim markers are tampered with, sometimes completely removed.  I have talked with many claim owners that have to deal with marking their claims over and over again because the markers are removed or vandalized.  Thus, I have learned how to do a little extra research before I head out to help me know when there are claims in the area that I will be prospecting.

When prospecting an area I always look for claim markers and signs, and if I find a place I want to get serious about digging I typically pull off the pack and take a walk around looking for corner posts in one direction.  A little internet research ahead of time will also help in knowing how much hiking I want to do to ensure I’m not on a claim.

The BLM provides Federal Mining Claim information online for free at LR 2000 website. If you look at the BLM Mining Claim packet, and their online help, they recommend to use the Pub MC (Mining Claim) Geo Report.  This report requires that you know a little bit about the area you want to search, specifically the MTR or Meridian Township Range, the Administration State, and the Case Disposition (Active, Closed, etc).  So as an example, I will show how I would identify active claims at one of my favorite areas in Colorado, Devils Head.

For this example, I already know the Administration State (Colorado) and Case Disposition (Active), but I need to find the MTR(s) that I want to research.  I do this by visiting another BLM site GeoCommunicator.  From the menu on the left side of the webpage I choose Interactive Maps and then All Layers.  A map displays allowing me to drill into the area I am interested in.  I then use the toolbar to choose the Identify option.

After zooming in, I choose the Identify icon in the toolbar

After zooming in, I choose the Identify icon in the toolbar

Then I click on the map to identify the Township where I’m interested in.  You can click the checkbox in the information box and it will outline the entire township visually.

Clicking somewhere on the map places the marker, then I check the Township box to show the township where you are researching federal mining claims

Clicking somewhere on the map places the marker, then I check the Township box to show the township where you are researching federal mining claims

I then repeat for as many townships as I want to research in the LR2000 database.

I continue to identify spots and check its Township until I have all the areas I want to research for federal mining claims

I continue to identify spots and check its Township until I have all the areas I want to research for federal mining claims

 Now I have 6 townships that I want to research identified.  The format is (for example the lower left):

  • State:  CO
  • Meridian:  06
  • Township:  10 South
  • Range:  69 West

Now I can enter the required fields in the Pub MC Geo Report on the LR 2000 website. The first thing I do on the LR2000 Reporting website is to select the criteria I want to use.  Obviously you don’t get a choice with State and Case Disposition, but for the other required field I choose MTR (Meridian, Township & Range) and then click the Select Criteria button.

I choose the MTR option for reporting, which is the most general requirement for researching federal mining claims database

I choose the MTR option for reporting, which is the most general requirement for researching federal mining claims database

Click the Set button to set each of the criteria.  For the MTR, you use the drop-down to select Meridian (06 – 6th PM) and then enter your Township (plus direction from the list) and Range (plus the direction from the list) and click the Add to MTR List button.  Do this for each of the MTRs you want to research, in my case I chose all six I found on the GeoCommunicator site.  NOTE, if you want to select multiple dispositions (for example, active and closed, hold the CTRL key and click all the options you want).

Select the state (CO) and disposition (ACTIVE) and then use the tool to add the MTRs

Select the state (CO) and disposition (ACTIVE) and then use the tool to add the MTRs

Now it is time to run the report by clicking the Run Report button.  I have noticed you may have to click it again if the pop-up window does not show up.  NOTE that this site uses pop-ups, so ensure that your pop-up blocker doesn’t suppress the report output window!!!  You will see a pop up with all your selected criteria and then another window will appear with all the claims in the area.

Ensure all values are uppercase, and click ok to run the report against the BLM's Oracle/Hyperion database.

Ensure all values are uppercase, and click ok to run the report against the BLM’s Oracle/Hyperion database.

The output doesn’t tell you the GPS coordinates of the claim, but it will tell you the Section and Subdivision along with the claim’s details including MTRS, name, serial number and information about the claim holder.  If you refer back to the GeoCommunicator website, the identify information “window” will let you drill into detailed information that will say what Section (the ‘S’ in MTRS) your identified point is in.

Pressing the Identify link (highlighted) will take you to more detail on this location.

Pressing the Identify link (highlighted) will take you to more detail on this location.

Click on the PLSS tab to see the section (the 'S' in MTRS) that your location is on.

Click on the PLSS tab to see the section (the ‘S’ in MTRS) that your location is on, in this example section is 029.  You will see this in the LR2000 database (if recorded) to know if your location on the map is in the same section as the claim.

As far as I have found, this is as detailed as you can get, but it will get you in the ballpark of where the claim(s) exists; and then you can visit the area in person and identify the claim by the corner posts that should clearly identify the claim name and which corner post you are looking at.

Please comment if you have other useful ways to identify federal mining claims.  Happy Rockhounding!

Rampart Range Prospecting

Did some digging today on the Rampart Range area on the Northeast side of the Pikes Peak Batholith.  This location is known for mainly Smoky Quartz but also sometimes Amazonite and Topaz crystals.  I started off prospecting a new area and did not find much so I wandered off to an old pegmatite I have worked in the past and went further into the zone I had found some crystals in previous years.  I was lucky today and found many smokey quartz including a couple of small plates, and some weak colored and shaped Amazonite.

I originally came upon this area as I saw some loose pegmatite upon the ground that was somewhat graphic.  Graphic granite is where the crystallization gets more pronounced and starts to get shapes and facets on one or many sides.  I was pulling large (50+ pounds) chunks of pegmatite out of the ground and then I came upon a zone that was much smaller chunks of rock.  After pulling out a couple of pieces smoky quartz started to fall out and then I saw a ceiling plate with a crystal intact.  This plate was about 20 pounds so I left it; but I did bring home two plates intact and was able to find 5 crystals that fit back into place…which was worth the haul of these very heavy rocks to the car.

I plan to hit this site one more time as I want to ensure the pocket pinched out, which it appeared to do; but the previous seam of crystals I found along this pegmatite did the same thing, so it obviously opened up a couple times.

Part of the top plate of the small pocket.  This crystal had fallen off but I was able to repair it.

Part of the top plate of the small pocket. This crystal had fallen off but I was able to repair it.

Another view of the top plate in the main part of the pocket!

Another view of the top plate in the main part of the pocket!

This was along the bottom of the pocket

This was along the bottom of the pocket

These two were repaired back together

These two were repaired back together

I love the point on this one.

I love the point on this one.

Nice crystal

Nice crystal

This crystal is mostly gemmy inside.

This crystal is mostly gemmy inside.

Kinda odd facets, but awesome crystal.

Kinda odd facets, but awesome crystal.

Nice large crystal.

Nice large crystal.

Love this point!

Love this point!

Some of the repaired and larger crystals; many or gemmy

Some of the repaired and larger crystals; many or gemmy

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These are mostly gemmy

These are mostly gemmy

Smaller but gemmy crystals!

Smaller but gemmy crystals!

Part of the larger bottom plate near the center of the pocket.

Part of the larger bottom plate near the center of the pocket.

Some light colored Amazonite crystals.

Some light colored Amazonite crystals.

These will require a long soaking; but I kinda like them as is...

These will require a long soaking; but I kinda like them as is…

 

Port Alberni British Columbia Salmon Festival

Went again this year for the 43rd Annual Port Alberni Salmon Festival with friends in British Columbia.  This is my 3rd year fishing in this large Labor Day weekend fishing Derby.  I took Hunter on his first major fishing trip and we had a blast.  Our hosts put together an amazing trip and provided top notch service on their fishing boats!  This is a trip of a lifetime and we had a wonderful time, fished with some excellent fishermen, and made some new friends.  We stayed at an amazing resort in Bamfield called Mills Landing, which I highly recommend!  They had very nice fish processing facilities and super friendly and knowledgeable hosts!

Hunter and I caught our bag limit of fish and was able to bring a good amount home for the freezer.  We had salmon for dinner the first night home and it is amazing!  Love the pink/orange look whenever we open the deep freezer!

The weather was great overall; one day was partly sunny and the swells were overall small; some days non-existent.  I’m prone to motion sickness (I can’t read my phone in the car) and at one point I caught up with a bit of nausea; Hunter had sea legs all the way home; but overall we did well in that department too!

We fished mostly with anchovies hooked up to a plastic head which allowed us to position the bait such that it “rolled” in the water.  The roll is important and needs to be nice and sexy for the big fish to have interest.  Then up the line was a plastic flasher/dodger which rotated in the water flashing sunlight in about 4 foot (or larger) circles in the water.  The line was clipped to a 10 pound downrigger attached to the side of the boat; and we fished anywhere from 65 to 25 feet under the surface.

First, the fish.  We caught anywhere from 5 to 10.5 pound Coho salmon, and small to 20 lb Chinook this year.  We caught numerous black bass fish that we didn’t know were on the line for a while; and since those were DOA we fed them to the eagles which was a lot of fun to see.

Click image for larger size.

Hunter and his big fish of the trip; this took a while for him to land...but worth it!  20 lb Chinook (Spring).

Dave's first Coho of the trip

Hunter's first fish, a 10 lb Coho

Steve and one of his fish.  He organized one hell of a fun trip! Thanks!

 

John taking care of tackle on his fishing boat!

John taking care of tackle on his fishing boat!

Fisherman during the Port Alberni Salmon Festival

Fisherman during the Port Alberni Salmon Festival

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Beach and cave on Fleming Island.

Beach and cave on Fleming Island.

Secret beach on Fleming Island.

Secret beach on Fleming Island.

Common view as we were fishing.

Common view as we were fishing.

Overcast day looking through a straight near Fleming Island.

Overcast day looking through a straight near Fleming Island.

You'd think they get a little bit of a breeze?

You’d think they get a little bit of a breeze?

Cool cottage!

Cool cottage!

Nice sunset from Red's Reef.

Nice sunset from Red’s Reef.

Another wonderful sunset in BC

Another wonderful sunset in BC

Great sunset over the Broken Islands.

Great sunset over the Broken Islands.

We had some sunny skies one afternoon, and some convection!

Over the Broken Islands

Over the Broken Islands

Eagles are part of the fun while the fishing is slow!

Eagles are part of the fun while the fishing is slow!

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Zeroed in on the prize.

Zeroed in on the prize.

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Eagles where everywhere, just look in the trees for a white dot.

Eagles where everywhere, just look in the trees for a white dot.

This eagle was perched above the main dock in Bamfield.

This eagle was perched above the main dock in Bamfield.

Landmark island from Kirby fishing area.

Landmark island from Kirby fishing area.

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Interesting "rainbow" feature from the airplane over Washington state.

Interesting “rainbow” feature from the airplane over Washington state.

Heart lake?

Love Lake?

 

Larkspur Lightning

I have been feeling under the weather all weekend and was dozing off when I thought I heard a rumble of thunder.  As always, that sound just does something to ignite my senses and I sat while awaiting another bolt.  A couple of minutes later one hit less than a mile away lighting up the entire sky and trees.  I quickly grabbed the camera and was able to grab some shots as the storm quickly intensified and headed east.  I can’t say I “chased” this storm, but it was nice to have a break of the doldrums of being sick.

From the back porch, the orange is Castle Rock (yuck) and the violet is the storm.

From the back porch, the orange is Castle Rock (yuck) and the violet is the storm.

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This one was interesting because it looked like a bat when i zoomed into the lightning.  Interesting cloud formation...

This one was interesting because it looked like a bat when i zoomed into the lightning. Interesting cloud formation…

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Supermoon & Geminids August 2014

It’s a couple days before the peak of the Geminids, one of my favorite meteorite showers I watch each year.  Fortunately and unfortunately the supermoon is full and setting right after dawn each morning, so the sky and ground is filled with lunar light!  I saw a couple of shooters but they were not as brilliant as usual due to the lunar light.

As I watched the sky, I realized the amount of nighttime light was probably how most folks in the suburbs see the sky on a good night!  I’m reminded how spoiled I am to live where I do on the Palmer Divide at nearly 7000 feet above sea level, in the forest far away from the city!

Perseids

2014 Perseids Shooting Star

Perseids shooting star

Perseids shooter over Cassiopeia. Very bright, about 1+ second.

Supermoon 2014

Supermoon August 11, 2014

Arkansas River Petrified Wood

Discovered some petrified wood while camping this last weekend.  We went camping in the Arkansas River valley across from Mt Antero, Princeton and Shivano.  Our secret private campsite at Ruby Mountain.  It was a muddy camp trip because of the monsoonal moisture, but that heavy rain helped cool it off in the evenings making for great camp sleeping!

I wanted to check out rocks in the Taylor Mountain / Missouri Hill area around some of the Marble and other quarries.  A fellow rockhound James was kind enough to give me some directions and advice on visiting this location, however he warned me that the road required a high clearance 4WD vehicle.  I went in our non-4WD knowing that I would probably have to park and walk a mile or two, however by the time I got up there the rains were coming in and I was running short on dry clothes.  I went almost to mile 4.5 of about 6 but eventually turned around and headed back down into the river valley.

I visit Ruby Mountain at least once per year and am not overly excited about the hard to find garnets and elusive topaz, and have more than enough apache tears from this location, so since I had a couple of hours left I decided to head down to Brown’s Canyon area as my only other visit several years back yielded nothing.  As described in Steve Voynick’s Colorado Rockhounding book, most of the side roads off of Chaffee County Road 194 past the private land lead to old Fluorspar mines.  I picked one side road and headed on a hike with my trusty Rock Hound Dog Boogie.

Boogie standing in the shade on this hot August day

Boogie standing in the shade on this hot August day

It was a hot day and we ended up at the mine which now is a nice makeshift gun range. It wasn’t that large of a reclaimed mine but I started to wander around and scout what was there.  I picked up many red, green, black and other cool colored stones that would I feel be great to tumble.  I found some fluorspar but nothing that great.  I was looking for smaller  fluorite crystals without any luck.  I did happen upon some agatized petrified wood and spent the rest of the hour or so I had looking for this.

Fluorspar mine in Browns Canyon

Fluorspar mine in Browns Canyon

Found a couple of really great camping sites while hiking as well; I hope to bring my kids back to this site someday and do some target practice, camping and more rockhounding!

The collection of nicer wood samples I found

The collection of nicer wood samples I found

Great texture and color in this sample

Great texture and color in this sample

Petrified Wood, love the way the wood grain turnson this one

Petrified Wood, love the way the wood grain turns and twists

Cool agatized petrified wood

Cool agatized petrified wood full of color!

Petrified Wood

Petrified Wood

Agatized petrified wood

Agatized petrified wood, the first rock I found this day

I love the detail on this piece of petrified wood

I love the detail on this piece of petrified wood

Random river rock with some cool patterns

Random river rock with some cool patterns

Cool river rock with Amethyst

Cool river rock with Amethyst

Backyard Mycology

Need help from all of you with Mycology expertise!  With the steady stream of precipitation this year we’ve had green everything all summer long; the first time since 1998.  We went out into the back yard forest last night and discovered that mushrooms are popping up EVERYWHERE!  I will capture more in the upcoming days but these were some of the different mushrooms we have thus far.  We typically only get the large puffballs, which we have a couple in the front yard right now.

There are a bunch more varieties, but they are all pretty much brown and mostly smaller; pictures didn’t come out too well.  These are the most interesting ones…

Gooey black can't be good!

How gooey can a mushroom get…there were black spots on the ground below this!

Larkspur Mycology - Fly Amanita

Found under a trampoline. Fly Amanita is poisonous.

Larkspur Mycology - Fly Amanita

Fly Amanita cap

Larkspur Mycology - Fly Amanita

Perhaps a Fly Amanita popping up out of the ground? Will know in a few days.

Larkspur Mycology - Fly Amanita

Gilled belly of the Fly Amanita

Awesome colors

Awesome colors! Perhaps a fly agaric? We’ll check back in a few days

The next two I believe are the same, they are in close proximity to each other.  One is by itself while the other is in a pair.  The cap is about an inch-inch and a half in size.

Larkspur Mycology

Still researching this one…

Larkspur Mycology -

Still researching this pair…

There are a couple of these in the taller grass.  Where the gills intersect with the top of the cap they are at the highest point.  The top of the cap is light brown.

Larkspur Mycology -

Still researching this one…

There are about 7 of these growing over a 20 foot semi circle area.  Each cap is between 5 and 8 inches in diameter.

Larkspur Mycology -

Lots of these, 5-7 inches.

This one was cool, really pretty yellow/orange with white spots on the cap.  I’ll check this one again in case the cap opens up in a few days.  The cap is about 2-3″.

Larkspur Mycology -

Great yellow color…still researching…

UPDATE.  Several days later I made a trip completely around the yard.  There are a ton of mushrooms, they are everywhere!  My neighbor came out and asked me what I was doing; then he pointed me to a few in his yard too!

Puffball Action!!!

Spiked Puffball

Spiked Puffball

Spiked Puffball

Spiked Puffball – way cool! About 6″.

Puffball Scleroderma citrinum

Tiny Puffball…Scleroderma citrinum?

Puffballs.  Morganella pyriformis

Puffballs… Morganella pyriformis?

Puffball

Puffball

Love the colors on the stalk

Love the colors on the stalk

Looks a bit scarey.

Looks a bit scarey.

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Orange Mushroom

Beautiful orange!

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red mushroom

Big red beast, about 8-9″

Like the little guy under the huge 8" shroom.

Like the little guy under the huge 8″ shroom.

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Great red color!

Great red color!

tn_Mushrooms-7906

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Prospecting Topaz near Pilot Peak

I was invited to prospect Topaz with an experience prospector, James, on his Topaz Claim near Pilot Peak about half way between Tarryall and Lake George, Colorado. Pilot Peak is likely one of the best Topaz localities in Colorado!  I have found topaz in this area before and was excited to learn more about prospecting topaz in the hopes that I can utilize this information to find that elusive stone in my favorite collecting areas around Devil’s Head.

Looking towards Pilot Peak, this area is jammed pack of claims.  The only one (periodically) open to the public is the Topaz Mountain Gem mine.

Looking towards Pilot Peak, this area is jammed pack of claims. The only one (periodically) open to the public is the Topaz Mountain Gem mine.  On the eastern face of these peaks is the Lost Creek Wilderness.

Here are some links to prior topaz days around this area:

We started the day finding the claim’s corner points (and posts, which are required on all active mining claims) and James showed me some areas of interest that he had in his earlier prospecting trips.  The first spot we happened upon was where there were nice signs of pegmatite on the surface, some rocks had quartz with flat sides which is always a great sign!  We dug here for a little while but couldn’t find anything interesting in the area. We dug uphill a little ways but still nothing similar to what we found on the ground. Perhaps this was a little seam left over from long ago  that was then above the surface level and has been sitting on top of the ground since?  Perhaps we just missed the small area?  Regardless, nothing was found in this area although I definitely feel that the area is worth more consideration and putting down test holes.

Float that was worth checking out.

Float that was worth checking out.

Some "sides" in the pegmatite in the float that is a great sign

Some “sides” in the pegmatite in the float; that is a great sign

In another spot we found a seam of finer grained granite (aplite) with some pegmatite. Following the aplite seam around we found a couple of spots that opened up; one into a small pocket (that someone before us had cleaned out).  Although we didn’t find anything worth keeping, it was great to see these signs.  I also experienced that pounding with chisel into granite is a lot of hard work!

 Seam with pegmatite.  We found nothing, but did some screening of the dirt around this.

Seam with pegmatite. We found nothing, but did some screening of the dirt around this.

Small pocket in the seam.

Here was the small pocket (with iron/red dirt). This vein flowed for about 100 feet.

Solid granite with pegmatite seam

Pegmatite lined this solid granite boulder, once part of the massive granite outcrop. White quartz with no signs of crystals.

We did quite a bit of hiking around the 20-acre claim area, which includes steep terrain filled with bushes and aspen trees, boulders big and small are everywhere.  There was a lot of up and down traversing the claim and by the end of the day we were exhausted, good news is it was awesome exercise!  The greatest part of climbing these hills was the magnificent views–part of the fun when prospecting the Colorado Rocky Mountains!

Cool cliffs in this area

Cool cliffs in this area

Looking south west towards the South Platte River

Looking south west towards the South Platte River

Large balance rock

Large balanced boulder!

Cool balanced rocks

Cool balanced rocks

Looking East.  The Front Range is out there somewhere...

Looking East. The Front Range is out there somewhere…

Again thanks to James for all the information and fun day on his claim!  I learned quite a bit about topaz prospecting!

Rocky Mountain Arsenal Tornado – July 28, 2014

Didn’t expect this today, witnessed the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Tornado from my office window!  Was sitting at work doing my thing when I noted a lot of cloud to ground lightning, and decided to take a break and look out the window.  I saw a large round section of cloud that looked interesting.  As I watched a small nipple formed (3:50pm) and start to slowly grow.  It was hard to tell if it was a funnel because it was rotating ever so slowly, but I could tell it was rotating.  The funnel continued to grow in size and I checked spotter network to see if it had been reported, and it had; they said a landspout at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal.

At this time there was a NWS tornado warning (radar) but it was near Fort Lupton which is a good distance to the north.  Shortly thereafter the cell was warned as it moved southwest (odd!) into western Aurora!  I watched the funnel for probably 10 minutes and then I could see the rain in the landspout funnel!  It lasted several more minutes and then became obscured by rain (4:05pm); although I could see the funnel for a little while longer.  About 20 minutes later I still saw what looked like a funnel but no landspout; although there was quite a bit of rain at the time too.

Awesome CG lightning in the area, including one that went through the funnel!  Great chase day, I probably walked 6 feet from my desk and saw the first tornado of the year! Chalk this one up on the list of tornados I’ve seen so far

July 28, 2014 Rocky Mountain Arsenal - funnel cloud

July 28, 2014 Rocky Mountain Arsenal – funnel cloud

Arsenal funnel gets larger

Arsenal funnel gets larger

Finally the rain illuminates the tornado / landspout.

Finally the rain illuminates the tornado / landspout.

July 28, 2014 Rocky Mountain Arsenal - landspout tornado

Great short chase, less than 20 feet and no driving required! :)

genoQs machines Octopus MIDI Sequencer – Obliq Museum

The genoQs machines Octopus MIDI sequencer is the all-time KING of step sequencers IMHO.  This hardware-only interface will boggle the mind of any laptop-jock, but for those like me that are into hardware this is probably one of the best sequencers that will ever be made.  This German engineered musical instrument controller is actually quite simple, ergonomic and elegant and packs a ton of power into your studio!  Any feature is less than two clicks away!

My only gripe is I’m not in my studio often enough and I tend to forget some of the steps for functionality; for example I always seem to hit the manual to remember how to put it in MIDI slave mode.  That is what cheat sheets are for.  If you have any handy cheat sheet references, leave a comment as I’d love to include them here.  I’ll upload mine soon.

Black Sea Octopus

The rare, limited edition genoQs machines Octopus Black Sea edition (#8 of 20) – King of MIDI Sequencers

I was so excited when I read about the release of this MIDI controller I contacted the manufacturer in Germany and put one on order.  Contractually I had to purchase through their US distributor but mine was the first one shipped to the USA.  A while later I had the chance to acquire the ultra cool and very limited Black Sea edition.  Although this is a beautiful edition, I ended up trading it and continued to use the original “Classic Legacy” edition in my studio.

Early in 2011 genoqs machines posted to the internet they were going to be going out of business; although they said they’d keep up their website and offer limited support.  Fast forward three years and their website is down and manuals and OS versions are hard to come by.  Often is the case with boutique equipment; I have no clue how many they sold, but with the several limited edition runs I suspect there are 200+ that made it to studios around the world!

genoQs machines octopus

genoQs machines Octopus (now called Classic Legacy edition) – First one imported into the USA – the brains in my studio (even when I’m there!)

I decided I would post what documentation and operating systems I had to the internet as these are scattered around the web (at best), and may become hard to find in the future.  If you have other documentation that I don’t or OS versions and would like to add to this archive, I’d be glad to include it here, please contact me if that is the case.

Here are a couple of pretty useless videos i shot when I had both the Original and Black Sea versions; more eye candy than anything useful.

Here are some of the files, again if you have files that I don’t, I’d love to improve this archive so please let me know what you have!

Operating Systems

Manuals

  • Legacy v1.62
  • Black Sea v1.62 (NOTE:  The Black Sea and other editions have exactly the same functionality, just different colored LEDs that are described accurately in this version.)

Other

Tutorials

Links

  • Yahoo Groups (lots of documentation and updated OS for Octopus and Nemo)