Quartz Crystal Pocket

large quartz crystal

I recently found a fun quartz crystal pocket which was a ton of fun to dig. It took 3 trips–3 different days–to get to the pocket’s end. This pocket experienced several growth periods as many were healed (the side that was originally attached broke off and points grew on that broken side) and 2 to 3 different secondary coatings grew. Underneath all the overgrowth the crystals are gemmy.

The bottom of the pocket grew in a pool of mud and much of crystals have a layer of mud on at least half of the sides that can only be removed by blasting it with media. Under that layer the crystals are dull and etched so it isn’t worth the effort to remove.

In the videos I try to describe what I’m finding and how I’m following the crystal trail. The start of the second video shows how I determined where to dig on day 2. The end of video 3 shows some of the finds “all cleaned up”.

8 Comments

  1. Hi there! Just wanted to say thanks for sharing, I’ve been following this log on and off for a few years. These videos are great. I’m totally getting the itch to get out and do some digging now that the weather is getting better and things should be melting off. If you don’t mind me asking, what general area was this pocket in? I get out to Devils Head / Rampart Area pretty often when the weather permits.. Thanks again for sharing your adventures! -Mike

      1. Thanks, and yes I always check and map out claims before heading out to Rampart, as there are plenty out there!

  2. Dave,
    Excellent videos, thanks. Very nice pocket, happy to see you and your dad enjoying the wonders of Mother nature.
    Curious, Devils Head area or LG claims?
    If ya ever have spare time in the Spring be happy to show you a few finds.
    Cheers
    Bob

  3. Your videos are great, and inspired my husband and I to take up rockhounding. We did the research, watched your videos, bought the books, and finally went out to dig at devils head. We got lucky finding one smoky quartz crystal. That being said, we trekked around and dug for hours – we can’t seem to find much help or guidance about what to look for on the surface when deciding where to dig or how others out there actually find these spots. Any pointers your don’t mind sharing? Thank you!

    Brittany and Clay

    1. Howdy. Thanks for this feedback, glad you are enjoying the hobby so far. You ask the golden question, which all prospectors over time wish they had a way to know for sure…but the answer is that’s not a very easy question to answer. Your experience sounds very similar to mine over the last decade. The good news is that over time you learn tips and hints that will help; the bad news is that I still come home empty handed more than 1/2 of the time so you should probably have that expectation too. My best advice is to join a rock club where you can go out with experienced people that help you in the field. In my experience this has been one of the most valuable learning tools for me. The most valuable experience for me has been to just get out there and move a bunch of dirt; and to pay attention to what is working and what isn’t, and to take those observations home and learn from the feedback. Join a club, I don’t think you’ll regret it, and they are typically really cheap! For example, the Lake George Gem & Mineral Club (the club I am currently coordinating all field trips for) is $25/year for a family membership and we have several field trips each year to help with exactly what you are asking. –dave

      1. Thank you so much for the response, it is definitely helpful to know that we aren’t just missing something obvious! We are so excited to keep going – we are hooked – and we will absolutely get into the clubs. Thanks again for the words of encouragement!

        Brittany and Clay

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